12 Black Pioneers Whose Contributions Undoubtedly Changed Education in America

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Aaron Lloyd Dixon  (born Jan. 2, 1949)

Dixon is an activist and politician who has worked to improve schools since the 1960s. His major contribution to academia came in the form of the Free Breakfast for School Children program. Dixon was one of the founding members of Seattle’s Black Panther chapter. He served as captain of this chapter in the 1970s.

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Nathan Hare  (born April 9, 1933)

Hare is a sociologist, activist, academic and psychologist who created and directed the first university Black Studies program in the country at San Francisco State University in 1969. When the college threatened to cut the program by half, he protested with students for five months. Hare was educated at Langston University and the University of Chicago.

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Comments

  1. Proud to be in such company….Dt. Deborah D. Dancy, Educator (Boston)